My Google Map Blog

Street View Cheerleaders

by QKSLR on Sep.05, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off : more...

You exit anus

by jeannot on Sep.04, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off :, , more...

The Jefferson Grid

by Timothy Whitehead on Sep.04, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Thank you to GEB reader Clare for pointing us to this story about the Jefferson Grid. The Jefferson Grid refers to the Public Land Survey System (PLSS) or the Rectangular Survey System used in many parts of the United States to plat, or divide, real property for sale and settling.

Anyone who has looked around the US has noticed that large parts of it are divided up into squares, one mile to a side, often highly visible in satellite imagery and often sporting irrigation circles. The article linked above explains why that is and some of the history behind it.


The state of Iowa is just a sea of squares.


Irrigation circles in Idaho, one in each square.

As you can see above this is not the most efficient use of the land and in some cases farmers have inserted smaller circles in between the larger ones. The most efficient layout of identical sized circles is the honeycomb pattern seen below:


This honeycomb irrigation pattern found near Boardman, Oregon, is actually quite rare.

You might think at first that the Jefferson Grid is a universal uniform grid covering the whole of the US, but as you can see on Wikipedia there are actually a number of different regions, each with its on reference lines and the different regions do not necessarily line up with each other. Also, due to the fact that there were no GPS’s at the time the original surveying was done, there are quite a lot of errors in the grids and it is not uncommon to see an area like the image below where things are not quite straight:


Parallelograms

The use of a grid is also not unique to the USA. Here is an area in Mexico that also uses a neat squared grid, except they use the metric system, so each square is two kilometres to a side.


A grid system in Mexico.


Many parts of the world such as Zambia, above, do not use a grid system.

For the locations featured in this post download this KML file.

Many cities around the world also have grid patterns highly visible from above, but perhaps that is a topic for another post.

The post The Jefferson Grid appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Comments Off : more...

Happy girl in the window

by StreetViewFun.com on Sep.04, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off : more...

Hi Google

by Morgoth on Sep.03, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off :, , , more...

Google Earth search vs Google Earth placemarks and street data

by Timothy Whitehead on Sep.03, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

As we have mentioned in the past new additions to Google Maps are almost immediately available in Google Earth search. However, the information shown in Google Earth placemarks and street maps is not refreshed very often – sometimes it takes over a year between updates.

This is because Google Earth search does not access the Google Earth database, but rather the Google Maps database. The advantage of this was recently made clear by the recent renaming of Mount McKinley in Alaska, which on August 28, 2015 was officially renamed Denali. If you search for ‘Denali’ in Google Earth you will be taken to the correct location, even though the mountain symbol in Google Earth still names it Mount McKinley and probably will do for some time to come. The name is correct in Google Maps because it was changed in Map Maker on August 31 just 3 days after the official name change.


Denali, Alaska, the highest mountain peak in North America.

The same effect applies to addresses and street names. When you search for an address it is the data in Google Maps that is used.

Also of note is the fact that the Google Earth weather layer is out of date again.Thank you to GEB reader Dee for letting us know. It is, as of this writing stuck at 2015-08-14 17:00 UTC.

The post Google Earth search vs Google Earth placemarks and street data appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Comments Off :, more...

Nice hat

by Morgoth on Sep.03, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off :, , more...

Beer tower

by Morgoth on Sep.02, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Spain, Street Views, USA

Comments Off :, , more...

Art from Google Earth imagery and the Google Maps/Earth TOS

by Timothy Whitehead on Sep.02, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

We recently came across two stories in the news about people creating art from Google Earth imagery. The first is this one about Mishka Henner. His work appears to consist of unaltered screen shots from Google Earth, either of aesthetically pleasing locations or collections of places of particular interest, such as “51 U.S. Military Outposts”. The article also mentions that to make high resolution images he takes hundreds of screen shots and laboriously stitches them together to make a final image. There are actually ways to automate this sort of thing, however, as we will discuss further on, doing so may violate Google Earth’s licence agreement.

The second story is this one about Meike Nixdorf, who creates stunning landscapes from Google Earth’s imagery. Unlike Mishka Henner’s work, which is mostly unaltered satellite / aerial imagery, Meike takes advantage of Google Earth’s 3D terrain and also retouches the screen-shots in Photoshop.

We have looked at similar art work in the past, including artist Federico Winer, who creates images from satellite imagery with adjusted colour and luminosity, Roosmarijn Pallandt, who creates carpets based on Google Earth imagery and a website dedicated to collecting artistic images from Google Earth imagery (sadly it appears to no longer be active). The USGS has an “Earth as Art” collection collected from landsat imagery and Google themselves have released the “Earth View” chrome plugin that shows selected satellite imagery in new Tabs in Chrome and has its own layer in Google Earth.

So, are these artists in violation of the Google Earth licence agreement? First of all, artists that use Landsat imagery obtained from the USGS have nothing to worry about, as there appears to be no restrictions on its use. To find out what uses of Google Earth and Maps are permissible read through the geoguidelines here. There are some clauses that some of the artists we mention above may be violating.

Firstly, whenever you use imagery from Google Earth or Google Maps you must always include full attribution for both Google and the supplier of any imagery or mapping data that appears in your image. Generally, whatever copyright notices appear at the bottom centre in Google Earth must be included either in your screen shot or added to the image caption. It is not clear whether the artists mentioned above are including proper attribution in their artwork, but certainly the images have been presented in the news articles without proper attribution.
Secondly, the geoguidelines forbid making changes to the imagery. The intention seems to be to ensure that you do not misrepresent what Google Earth or Google Maps look like to the detriment of the products’ reputation so it is not clear whether adding artistic touches would concern Google, but it does appear to violate the Terms of Service (TOS).
Thirdly, the sale of artwork based on Google Earth or Google Maps imagery appears to be explicitly forbidden in the case of physical items such as T-shirts or mugs. This suggests that a physical ‘painting’ would also be forbidden. The restriction doesn’t apply to books (with the exception of books with navigational content such as guide books) but it is likely that selling a book consisting mostly of Google Earth / Google Maps imagery is in violation of the copyrights unless permission is explicitly granted by both Google and the imagery providers.


Mariveles Reef, Spratley Islands. Whenever you use a screen shot from Google Earth as above, make sure that the Google Earth logo and the copyright notices at the bottom centre are clearly visible, or include them in the image caption.

The post Art from Google Earth imagery and the Google Maps/Earth TOS appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Comments Off :, more...

Reading at the beach

by Real Murcia C.F. on Sep.02, 2015, under 3D Models, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, California, Denmark, England, Germany, Google Earth News, Google Earth Tips, Google Sky, Google maps, Hawaii, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Natural Landmarks, Netherlands, Sightseeing, Street Views, USA

Comments Off :, , , more...

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...